Coping with chronic pain

The brain can be thought of as a switchboard taking messages from sensors all over the body. When we are injured, we feel acute pain which is sharp and specific and these messages are carried by fast A fibres. Chronic pain such as throbbing, aching or burning tends to be less specific and may occur
sometime after an injury – these messages are carried by slower C fibres.
The brain can be thought of as a switchboard taking messages from sensors all over the body. When we are injured, we feel acute pain which is sharp and specific and these messages are carried by fast A fibres. Chronic pain such as throbbing, aching or burning tends to be less specific and may occur
sometime after an injury – these messages are carried by slower C fibres.

In the brain, the messages carried by the A fibres are given precedence so, if you have an aching muscle (C fibres) but then burn yourself on a hot pan (A fibres), the pain from the burn will take precedence and you will not feel the muscle ache.

Hypnotherapy can make use of this ‘Pain Gate’ to direct attention away from pain. Pain is almost always accompanied by an emotional reaction and messages are stronger when we are anxious, panicky or depressed. So, by being relaxed and calm, we can help to reduce the pain. We can learn to cope better with pain by selecting the messages that are allowed through.

If you wish to have further information on the use of hypnotherapy in coping with pain, please contact Jane Fox via the contact page on this website.